My name is Christina. This is a personal blog.


Light skinned Xican@ in FL


Fat, queer, non-binary, disabled, mentally ill, married, infertile. she/her or they/them


I live with a myriad of chronic illnesses and chronic pain.

 I own a pug Bugsy and a boston terrier Lola and a cat named Eris.

Please don't hesitate to call me out if I ever say or reblog something inappropriate.

I do not consent to use of my likeness or any of my original material on any forum other than Tumblr without my express written permission

 

The term Chicano is derived from the word Mejicano or Mexican, which it itself is rooted in the word Mexicano (with the “x” pronounced as “ch”) within the Nahuatl language from which it stems. Mexicano was thus in reference to the Mexica, or Aztecs as later called by the Spanish colonists, and was derived from the union of four terms: meztli (moon), xictli (bellybutton), coyotl (offspring, child of), noxt (yes). Although translations rarely do justice to actual meanings of words, it is from these root words that mexica translates roughly to ‘children from the bellybutton of the moon’. Likewise, xicano, from its Nahuatl base can be taken to mean an affirmation ‘Yes! I am the child of the bellybutton/earth’.

Robert Hernandez, Running for Peace and Dignity

this made my heart melt… somos el obligito de la luna/we are the moon’s bellybutton

(via la-xingada)

(Source: tonanzin-x)

White supremacy is deeply ingrained in Latin America and continues into the present. In Mexico, for instance, citizens of African descent (who are estimated to make up 1% of the population) report that they regularly experience racial harassment at the hands of local and state police, according to recent studies by Antonieta Gimeno, then of Mount Holyoke College, and Sagrario Cruz-Carretero of the University of Veracruz.

Mexican public discourse reflects the hostility toward blackness; consider such common phrases as “getting black” to denote getting angry, and “a supper of blacks” to describe a riotous gathering of people. Similarly, the word “black” is often used to mean “ugly.” It is not surprising that Mexicans who have been surveyed indicate a disinclination to marry darker-skinned partners, as reported in a 2001 study by Bobby Vaughn, an anthropology professor at Notre Dame de Namur University.

Anti-black sentiment also manifests itself in Mexican politics. During the 2001 elections, for instance, Lazaro Cardenas, a candidate for governor of the state of Michoacan, is believed to have lost substantial support among voters for having an Afro Cuban wife. Even though Cardenas had great name recognition (as the grandson of Mexico’s most popular president), he only won by 5 percentage points — largely because of the anti-black platform of his opponent, Alfredo Anaya, who said that “there is a great feeling that we want to be governed by our own race, by our own people.”

Tanya K. Hernandez, from “Roots of Latino/Black anger

RWSWJ/ RAWJ

(via theblacknonblackdivide)

mineralists:

Boracite is a rare mineral from evaporite deposits at Boulby Mine in Cleveland

mineralists:

Boracite is a rare mineral from evaporite deposits at Boulby Mine in Cleveland

(Source: flickr.com)

snailfart:

The cauldron spilled over.

Purple ombre / jelly sandwich, bottom —› top:

  • Zoya Miley
  • L’Oreal Lilac Coolers
  • L’Oreal Berry Nice
  • Max Factor Fantasy Fire
  • Kleancolor Chunky Holo Black

Orange swirl dry marble:

  • Sinful Colors Cloud 9
  • Sinful Colors Opal Glitter
  • NYC Purple Pizzazz Frost

http://angelboyangelboy.tumblr.com/post/100254062067/facebook-deleted-my-primary-account-without

jobhaver:

angelboyangelboy:

Facebook deleted my primary account without warning yesterday and has rejected my submission of my government-issued state ID/explanation of extenuating context. They have also disabled every effort I have made to make a new account.

This is silencing. I am not the only trans person this has happened to. Facebook is targeting—either directly or indirectly, through the easily abused “report” functionality—at-risk users, including trans people, sex workers, survivors, and activists/advocates. Evidently, Facebook doesn’t think these identities are “authentic.” 

Are we not all entitled to the same rights to privacy and identity? If Facebook wants to brand itself as a “positive force,” should it not emphasize the protection of at-risk users? This cannot be tolerated. 

I don’t know if everyone has heard about this, but D. Dragonetti, a non-binary trans person who has been facing a lot of online harassment after outing people in the Alt-Lit community as abusers, has had his facebook account repeatedly shut down after being reported to facebook staff as using a false name.

Just in case anyone thought that facebook’s photo-ops with drag queens signaled a real commitment to ending their policy of enabling harassment of trans persons using their community reporting system and wasn’t just a PR stunt orchestrated to get trans people to shut up

Did you know that blackface does not violate Facebook’s community standards?

postracialcomments:

jcoleknowsbest:

latinosexuality:

jcoleknowsbest:

invisibleblackunicorn:

mimicryisnotmastery:

blackbabesupremacy:

What happened in Puerto Rico

I wanna know what happened in Puerto Rico

It’s too late for me to remember where I put the receipts for this, but IIRC more experiments + forced hysterectomies on women.

^^^ yeap… 

keep in mind Tuskegee happened at a HBCU and lasted 40 years (originally only planned to last 3 months) and the US knew of a ‘cure” penicillin. 

In Puerto Rico: oral birth control pills trials (with not full disclosure given to participants and some deaths during trials) more at PBS “The Puerto Rican Pill Trials" this also happened in Haiti

My testimonio re: not celebrating the pill here. (tw: white folks don’t like my pov just see comments and this article was posted on other sites where white folks didn’t dig it either).

forced sterilization of PR women (we still have the highest rates of sterilization, read more about the 3 generations of sterilization (non-consensual and consensual) in her book, Matters of Choice, Iris Rodriguez who does qualitative work interviewing women in families, she also coined the phrase “agency within constraints” in her texts about this topic. this has happened with various women of color and women with disabilities throughout US history and currently. 

reblogging for info

Forced Sterilization in the US South as well

The disgusting history of POC and the medical field. So many cases and so much erasure 

(Source: coutois)